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Friday
Sep132013

Slow day at ZDNet? They don’t think the Raspberry Pi is a real computer

RaspPiBefore I begin my rant, please take a moment and read this post: How I spent almost 150 on a 35 computer.  Go on, I’ll wait.

Read it? Good.

OK, now on one level, Mr. Hess is correct: if you do not already have spare keyboards, mice, SD cards, etc., then, yes, the Pi WILL cost you more. BUT…on every other level, he wrong and wrong by a long shot.

First, lets get this out of the way: NO MATTER WHAT IT COST, it is still a computer. It fits every definition of a computer. It has input. It has output. It has a CPU. It has memory. It is programmable.  What it does not have, and the Foundation NEVER claimed that it did, are the PERIPHERALS that make it usable for humans.  The fact that it does not come with a monitor, keyboard or mouse does not disqualify it for a computer. Hell, if it did, the Apple Mac Mini would fail that definition as well. When I bought my Mini, I had spend almost another $100 JUST TO MAKE IT USABLE, and that did not include a monitor, which I already had. If I had to buy a monitor as well, the Mac Mini would have been nearly $300 more, at which case, I could have purchased a sweet Windows laptop. (Which, in hindsight, I should have done.)  So, if the Mini did not come with anything other than a power cord, does that disqualify it? No.

Now, Mr. Hess works in a very large datacenter with, presumably, some very large computers as well. I’m sure that not all of them have keyboards, mice and printers attached.  They very likely also lack monitors.  The datacenter in my former employer’s satellite office is full of computers that do not have anything other than network gear attached.  They are still computers.

Back to the Pi.

Yes, I will agree that you do need to spend more on it if you do not have everything. My Pi cost me right at a hundred dollars, but that is because I purchased a Motorola Atrix Laptop Dock and made the Pi a laptop. I also had to buy a special HDMI cable to connect it to the laptop dock. However, if I only used one of my small televisions, it would have cost me ten dollars more for the WiFi dongle I bought. I already had a few, but I wanted one of those tiny ones that do not stick out.  So, ten bucks more. I wanted the sharp HDMI display and integrated keyboard/mousepad that the Atrix Laptop Dock had, and I do not regret it.

And that dongle brings me to another one of Mr. Hess’ invalid points: the USB.  My Pi has a keyboard, mouse and WiFi and all are USB. To be fair, one of the Pi’s USB ports is taken up with the Laptop Dock, which includes two additional ports and the keyboard and mouse are built in, but are, nonetheless, USB. USB hubs have gotten very small and would work well on a Pi.  My desktop computer needed two hubs for all of its peripherals.

I have yet to acquire a computer that did not cost me more money a short time after purchase/acquisition. EVERY PC that I have purchased has resulted in a trip back to the store to purchase something additional.  Hell, the iPad cost me almost twice as much when you add in the extra power cable/charger, keyboard dock, camera kit, cases, Bluetooth keyboard,etc.  My Kindle Fire, which is not expandable, at all, still cost me extra since I bought a case and software.  My Asus Windows 8 tablet cost nearly a hundred bucks more since I had to buy a huge SD card and an external bluetooth keyboard.

I don’t know if Mr. Hess had nothing else to write about, or if ZDNet was just having a slow day, but this piece of drivel is just embarrassing for them.  Clearly, Mr. Hess does not ‘get it’.  The Pi and pretty much every other computer like it (including the awesome little Basic Stamp next to me right now) are for educational, hobby and other types of development. They are not meant to be used like a $299 computer you buy at Wal-Mart. Although the Pi is just as capable, though a bit on the slow side.

Ultimately, his post is his opinion and he is free to share it.  The problem, though, is that someone who may not know any better may not consider the Pi now because this man doesn’t think it is a computer. The Pi is perfect for young and old alike to learn the fantastic world of computing.  Once they are comfortable, they move on and pass the Pi to someone else.

I wonder what he thinks of the millions of computers you could buy in the late 1970’s through the very early ‘90s. Most of them lacked monitors, mass storage, some did not have keyboards and most did not even have a gui and, thusly, did not need a mouse.  I don’t know, I loved my TRS-80 Color COMPUTER.  All 32k bytes and 16 colors of it.

Oh, I almost forgot…appearing with Mr. Hess’ post…I saw this.

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